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Patient News

Self-treating Tick Bites | What to do if you are bitten by Tick? | Information leaflet

Ticks are small, spider-like creatures which feed on the blood of birds and mammals, including humans.

They are common in the New Forest and can be found anywhere outdoors, such as grassy or wooded areas 

  • Ticks can bite you anywhere on your body, including in your hair, so using insect repellent, staying to clearly defined paths when walking, and regular 'tick checks' are important
  • It's important to remove ticks as quickly and as safely as possible as they can sometimes cause localised infection
  • Ticks do not need to be removed by a healthcare professional as it is usually straight forward and easy to do ...

Please see the information leaflet below to find instructions about what to do if you are bitten by a tick.

Tick Bite - Information Leaflet

Ticks are small, spider-like creatures which feed on the blood of birds and mammals, including humans.

They are common in the New Forest and can be found anywhere outdoors, such as grassy or wooded areas 

  • Ticks can bite you anywhere on your body, including in your hair, so using insect repellent, staying to clearly defined paths when walking, and regular 'tick checks' are important
  • It's important to remove ticks as quickly and as safely as possible as they can sometimes cause localised infection
  • Ticks do not need to be removed by a healthcare professional as it is usually straight forward and easy to do ...

Please see the information leaflet below to find instructions about what to do if you are bitten by a tick.

Tick Bite - Information Leaflet

28 Jun, 2024
25 Jun, 2024
Flight Anxiety Medication

We will no longer be providing Diazepam or similar drugs for flight anxiety and instead suggest the below aviation industry recommended flight anxiety courses.

Flight anxiety does not come under the remit of General Medical Services as defined in the GP contract and so we are not obliged to prescribe for this.  Patients who still wish to take benzodiazepines for flight anxiety are advised to consult with a private GP or travel clinic. 

For further information: 

https://thefearofflying.com/

https://fearlessflyer.easyjet.com/

https://www.britishairways.com/en-gb/information/travel-assistance/flying-with-confidence

https://www.flyingwithoutfear.com/

British National Formulary; Diazepam - https://bnf.nice.org.uk/drug/diazepam.html

British National Formulary; Hypnotics and anxiolytics - https://bnf.nice.org.uk/treatment-summary/hypnotics-and-anxiolytics.html

Generalised anxiety disorder and panic disorder in adults: management. NICE Clinical guideline [CG113] Published date: January 2011 Last updated: July - https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg113

Acute and delayed effects of Alprazolam on flight phobics during exposure. Behav Res Ther. 1997 Sep;35(9):831-41

Travel Health Pro; Medicines and Travel; Carrying medication abroad and advice regarding falsified medication - https://travelhealthpro.org.uk/factsheet/43/medicines-abroad

 

Flight Anxiety  
Use of Benzodiazepines (and related medications) for Flying  
Benzodiazepines (e.g., Diazepam/ Lorazepam/Temazepam/Alprazolam/ Clonazepam) are drugs which have been in use since the 1960s for treatment of a wide range of conditions including alcohol withdrawal, agitation and restlessness, anxiety, epilepsy and seizures, neurological disorders. muscle spasms, psychiatric disorders, and sleep disturbance  
Initial use of benzodiazepines, including the well-known Diazepam also known as ‘Valium’, was enthusiastic and they were hailed as a wonder drug. However, it became increasingly clear that, as well as having short term deleterious effects on memory, co-ordination, concentration, and reaction times, they were also addictive if used for a long time, with withdrawal leading to fits, hallucinations, agitation, and confusion, and further had long-term effects on cognition and balance. Unfortunately, benzodiazepines have also become a widely used drug of abuse since they first came on the market. Because of these reasons the use of benzodiazepines has been a lot more controlled around the world since the 1980-90s, especially in the UK. Diazepam in the UK is a Class C/Schedule IV controlled drug. The following short guide outlines the issues surrounding its use with regards to flying and why the surgery no longer prescribes such medications for this purpose.  
People often request that the doctor or nurse prescribe diazepam for fear of flying or assist with sleep during flights. Diazepam is a sedative, which means it makes you sleepy and more relaxed. There are several very good reasons why prescribing this drug is not recommended.  
• According to the prescribing guidelines doctors follow (British National Formulary) diazepam is contraindicated (not allowed) in treating phobic states. It also states that [i] “the use of benzodiazepines to treat short-term ‘mild’ anxiety is inappropriate.” [ii] Your doctor would be taking a significant legal risk by prescribing against these guidelines. They are only licensed short term for a crisis in generalised anxiety. If this is the case, you should be getting proper care and support for your mental health and not going on a flight.  
• NICE guidelines suggest that medication should not be used for mild and self-limiting mental health disorders, [iii] In more significant anxiety related states, benzodiazepines, sedating antihistamines, or antipsychotics should not be prescribed. Benzodiazepines are only advised for the short-term use for a crisis in generalised anxiety disorder in which case they are not fit to fly. Fear of flying in isolation is not a generalised anxiety disorder.  
• Although plane emergencies are a rare occurrence there are concerns about reduced awareness and reaction times for patients taking Diazepam which could pose a significant risk of not being able to react in a manner which could save their life in the event of an emergency on board necessitating evacuation.  
• The use of such sedative drugs can make you fall asleep, however when you do sleep it is an unnatural non-REM sleep. This means you won’t move around as much as during natural sleep. This can cause you to be at an increased risk of developing a blood clot (Deep Vein Thrombosis - DVT) in the leg or even the lungs. Blood clots are very dangerous and can even prove fatal. This risk is even greater if your flight is greater than 4 hours, the amount of time which has been shown to increase the risk of developing DVT whether in an aeroplane or elsewhere.  
• Whilst most people find Diazepam sedating, a small number have paradoxical agitation and aggression. They can also cause disinhibition and lead you to behave in a way that you would not normally which can pose a risk on the plane. This could impact on your safety as well as that of other passengers and could also get you into trouble with the law. A similar effect can be seen with alcohol, which has led to people being removed from flights.  
• A study published in 1997 from the Stanford University School of Medicine[iv] showed that there is evidence use of Benzodiazepines stops the normal adjustment response that would gradually lessen anxiety over time and therefore perpetuates and may increase anxiety in the long term, especially if used repeatedly.  
• Diazepam and similar controlled drugs are illegal in several countries[v]. They may be confiscated, or you may find yourself in trouble with the police. The passenger may also need to use a different strategy for the homeward bound journey and/or other legs of the journey.  
• Diazepam stays in your system for quite a while. If your job requires you to submit to random drug testing, you may fail this having taken diazepam.  
• It is important to declare all medical conditions and medications you take to your travel insurer. If not, there is a risk of nullifying any insurance policy you may have.  


 

We will no longer be providing Diazepam or similar drugs for flight anxiety and instead suggest the below aviation industry recommended flight anxiety courses.

Flight anxiety does not come under the remit of General Medical Services as defined in the GP contract and so we are not obliged to prescribe for this.  Patients who still wish to take benzodiazepines for flight anxiety are advised to consult with a private GP or travel clinic. 

For further information: 

https://thefearofflying.com/

https://fearlessflyer.easyjet.com/

https://www.britishairways.com/en-gb/information/travel-assistance/flying-with-confidence

https://www.flyingwithoutfear.com/

British National Formulary; Diazepam - https://bnf.nice.org.uk/drug/diazepam.html

British National Formulary; Hypnotics and anxiolytics - https://bnf.nice.org.uk/treatment-summary/hypnotics-and-anxiolytics.html

Generalised anxiety disorder and panic disorder in adults: management. NICE Clinical guideline [CG113] Published date: January 2011 Last updated: July - https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg113

Acute and delayed effects of Alprazolam on flight phobics during exposure. Behav Res Ther. 1997 Sep;35(9):831-41

Travel Health Pro; Medicines and Travel; Carrying medication abroad and advice regarding falsified medication - https://travelhealthpro.org.uk/factsheet/43/medicines-abroad

 

Flight Anxiety  
Use of Benzodiazepines (and related medications) for Flying  
Benzodiazepines (e.g., Diazepam/ Lorazepam/Temazepam/Alprazolam/ Clonazepam) are drugs which have been in use since the 1960s for treatment of a wide range of conditions including alcohol withdrawal, agitation and restlessness, anxiety, epilepsy and seizures, neurological disorders. muscle spasms, psychiatric disorders, and sleep disturbance  
Initial use of benzodiazepines, including the well-known Diazepam also known as ‘Valium’, was enthusiastic and they were hailed as a wonder drug. However, it became increasingly clear that, as well as having short term deleterious effects on memory, co-ordination, concentration, and reaction times, they were also addictive if used for a long time, with withdrawal leading to fits, hallucinations, agitation, and confusion, and further had long-term effects on cognition and balance. Unfortunately, benzodiazepines have also become a widely used drug of abuse since they first came on the market. Because of these reasons the use of benzodiazepines has been a lot more controlled around the world since the 1980-90s, especially in the UK. Diazepam in the UK is a Class C/Schedule IV controlled drug. The following short guide outlines the issues surrounding its use with regards to flying and why the surgery no longer prescribes such medications for this purpose.  
People often request that the doctor or nurse prescribe diazepam for fear of flying or assist with sleep during flights. Diazepam is a sedative, which means it makes you sleepy and more relaxed. There are several very good reasons why prescribing this drug is not recommended.  
• According to the prescribing guidelines doctors follow (British National Formulary) diazepam is contraindicated (not allowed) in treating phobic states. It also states that [i] “the use of benzodiazepines to treat short-term ‘mild’ anxiety is inappropriate.” [ii] Your doctor would be taking a significant legal risk by prescribing against these guidelines. They are only licensed short term for a crisis in generalised anxiety. If this is the case, you should be getting proper care and support for your mental health and not going on a flight.  
• NICE guidelines suggest that medication should not be used for mild and self-limiting mental health disorders, [iii] In more significant anxiety related states, benzodiazepines, sedating antihistamines, or antipsychotics should not be prescribed. Benzodiazepines are only advised for the short-term use for a crisis in generalised anxiety disorder in which case they are not fit to fly. Fear of flying in isolation is not a generalised anxiety disorder.  
• Although plane emergencies are a rare occurrence there are concerns about reduced awareness and reaction times for patients taking Diazepam which could pose a significant risk of not being able to react in a manner which could save their life in the event of an emergency on board necessitating evacuation.  
• The use of such sedative drugs can make you fall asleep, however when you do sleep it is an unnatural non-REM sleep. This means you won’t move around as much as during natural sleep. This can cause you to be at an increased risk of developing a blood clot (Deep Vein Thrombosis - DVT) in the leg or even the lungs. Blood clots are very dangerous and can even prove fatal. This risk is even greater if your flight is greater than 4 hours, the amount of time which has been shown to increase the risk of developing DVT whether in an aeroplane or elsewhere.  
• Whilst most people find Diazepam sedating, a small number have paradoxical agitation and aggression. They can also cause disinhibition and lead you to behave in a way that you would not normally which can pose a risk on the plane. This could impact on your safety as well as that of other passengers and could also get you into trouble with the law. A similar effect can be seen with alcohol, which has led to people being removed from flights.  
• A study published in 1997 from the Stanford University School of Medicine[iv] showed that there is evidence use of Benzodiazepines stops the normal adjustment response that would gradually lessen anxiety over time and therefore perpetuates and may increase anxiety in the long term, especially if used repeatedly.  
• Diazepam and similar controlled drugs are illegal in several countries[v]. They may be confiscated, or you may find yourself in trouble with the police. The passenger may also need to use a different strategy for the homeward bound journey and/or other legs of the journey.  
• Diazepam stays in your system for quite a while. If your job requires you to submit to random drug testing, you may fail this having taken diazepam.  
• It is important to declare all medical conditions and medications you take to your travel insurer. If not, there is a risk of nullifying any insurance policy you may have.  


 

Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Wait Times

The below website contains helpful information for patients waiting for clinical opinion, treatment, or surgery.

https://www.myplannedcare.nhs.uk/seast/portsmouth/

The below website contains helpful information for patients waiting for clinical opinion, treatment, or surgery.

https://www.myplannedcare.nhs.uk/seast/portsmouth/

18 Jun, 2024
29 May, 2024
Support for people who may have been affected by infected blood

We know that people may be concerned about their own health following recent media coverage, so NHS England have set up a new online resource for people

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/support-for-people-who-may-have-been-affected-by-infected-blood/

 

 

We know that people may be concerned about their own health following recent media coverage, so NHS England have set up a new online resource for people

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/support-for-people-who-may-have-been-affected-by-infected-blood/

 

 

Supporting Parents & Carers for Under Ones

The below link contains details of the Hampshire Safeguarding Children Partnership (HSCP) Toolkit on Supporting Parents and Carers for Under Ones.  This has been developed to support new and expectant parents and carers living in Hampshire, the toolkit provides useful information and resources to help you feel more confident and prepared for the first year of your baby’s life.

https://www.hampshirescp.org.uk/parents-and-carers/supporting-parents-for-under-ones/

 

The below link contains details of the Hampshire Safeguarding Children Partnership (HSCP) Toolkit on Supporting Parents and Carers for Under Ones.  This has been developed to support new and expectant parents and carers living in Hampshire, the toolkit provides useful information and resources to help you feel more confident and prepared for the first year of your baby’s life.

https://www.hampshirescp.org.uk/parents-and-carers/supporting-parents-for-under-ones/

 

11 Jun, 2024
4 Jun, 2024
Health A to Z - NHS

Find information on hundreds of health conditions and treatments from the NHS website. Your complete guide to conditions, symptoms and treatments, including what to do and when to get help.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/

Find information on hundreds of health conditions and treatments from the NHS website. Your complete guide to conditions, symptoms and treatments, including what to do and when to get help.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/

Find your NHS number

The below website can be used to find your NHS Number.

https://www.nhs.uk/nhs-services/online-services/find-nhs-number/

The below website can be used to find your NHS Number.

https://www.nhs.uk/nhs-services/online-services/find-nhs-number/

4 Jun, 2024
10 Jul, 2024
Find a Pharmacy

The below website can be used to find your nearest Pharmacy 

https://www.nhs.uk/service-search/pharmacy/find-a-pharmacy

The below website can be used to find your nearest Pharmacy 

https://www.nhs.uk/service-search/pharmacy/find-a-pharmacy

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NHS Eye Screening Patient Portal

Manage your eye screening appointments online with our patient portal.

 

Manage your eye screening appointments online with our patient portal.

 

7 May, 2024
22 Apr, 2024
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Volunteers Needed | Denmead Communicare

Denmead Communicare needs your help to expand it's pool of volunteer drivers to take individuals without easy access to medical appointments, local shop clubs and attractions.

Please contact Richard or Lyn for more details:

Richard Ayers: 07749 755275

Lyn Farminer: 02932 265284

Denmead Communicare needs your help to expand it's pool of volunteer drivers to take individuals without easy access to medical appointments, local shop clubs and attractions.

Please contact Richard or Lyn for more details:

Richard Ayers: 07749 755275

Lyn Farminer: 02932 265284

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You can book your COVID-19 vaccination this spring - April 2024

You can book your COVID-19 vaccination this spring if:

  • you're aged 75 or over (by 30 June 2024) 

or

  • your NHS record suggests you may have a weakened immune system due to a health condition or medical treatment.

To find out more and book your COVID vaccine, please visit the website below or call 119 (translators are available)

www.nhs.uk - Book or manage a COVID-19 vaccination appointment

You can book your COVID-19 vaccination this spring if:

  • you're aged 75 or over (by 30 June 2024) 

or

  • your NHS record suggests you may have a weakened immune system due to a health condition or medical treatment.

To find out more and book your COVID vaccine, please visit the website below or call 119 (translators are available)

www.nhs.uk - Book or manage a COVID-19 vaccination appointment

11 Apr, 2024
2 Feb, 2024
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Important Update - Rowans Living Well Services (LWS)
Antibiotic resistance

Take Care, Not Antibiotics.

Antibiotics are no longer routinely used to treat infections.

This is because:

  • many infections are caused by viruses, so antibiotics are not effective
  • antibiotics are often unlikely to speed up the healing process and can cause side effects
  • the more antibiotics are used to treat trivial conditions, the more likely they are to become ineffective for treating more serious conditions

Both the NHS and health organisations across the world are trying to reduce the use of antibiotics, especially for health problems that are not serious.

Take Care, Not Antibiotics.

Antibiotics are no longer routinely used to treat infections.

This is because:

  • many infections are caused by viruses, so antibiotics are not effective
  • antibiotics are often unlikely to speed up the healing process and can cause side effects
  • the more antibiotics are used to treat trivial conditions, the more likely they are to become ineffective for treating more serious conditions

Both the NHS and health organisations across the world are trying to reduce the use of antibiotics, especially for health problems that are not serious.

3 Nov, 2023
1 Nov, 2023
Important Update: Changes to Patient Transport Booking Access

Effective From 1st November : Practices will no longer have access to book patient transport - the patient / relative or carers can access the booking portal and will be required to book their own non-urgent transport.

Please click here for further information.

Effective From 1st November : Practices will no longer have access to book patient transport - the patient / relative or carers can access the booking portal and will be required to book their own non-urgent transport.

Please click here for further information.

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NHS App: A More Secure and Reliable Way to Receive Messages from Your Surgery

Please click the link below to download the NHS App.

NHS App | www.nhs.uk

Please click the link below to download the NHS App.

NHS App | www.nhs.uk

18 Aug, 2023
20 Oct, 2022
Practice Training Dates and Closures

Throughout the year the practice provides both medical and administration staff, training to improve their skills and knowledge base. All Practice Staff are required to attend these training days.

During this time the surgery will be closed 12:30 onwards.

Prior to each training session we will advise patients of the dates with information posters around the surgery and a telephone message to advise patients what to do on the day. When the surgery is shut for training telephone cover is provided by East Berkshire OOHs service for Emergencies.  

BASE - Protected learning time dates - Surgery closed at 12:30.

See our Opening Hours page for details.

Throughout the year the practice provides both medical and administration staff, training to improve their skills and knowledge base. All Practice Staff are required to attend these training days.

During this time the surgery will be closed 12:30 onwards.

Prior to each training session we will advise patients of the dates with information posters around the surgery and a telephone message to advise patients what to do on the day. When the surgery is shut for training telephone cover is provided by East Berkshire OOHs service for Emergencies.  

BASE - Protected learning time dates - Surgery closed at 12:30.

See our Opening Hours page for details.

The Denmead Voluntary Care Group

The Denmead Voluntary Care Group 

The DVCG exists to help and support the patients of the Denmead Health Centre, including those from Hambledon and the surrounding area. 

It is appreciated that being in the countryside, public transport links to the area’s hospitals and treatment centres are extremely limited. 

The Health Centre Reception can provide you with a telephone number to contact one of our coordinators to assist with your transport needs. 

A volunteer driver can collect you from your home and take you to your appointment, assist you in getting you to the right department, wait for you, and to take you home on completion. 

All we ask for is a contribution towards costs. 

We also have a minibus which does various trips to village functions, shopping centres and day trip outings. 

While sadly it is not equipped to accommodate wheelchair users, if you can climb the steps into the minibus it will open up many opportunities to getting out and about in our area. 

See the Practice Noticeboard for details.

The Denmead Voluntary Care Group 

The DVCG exists to help and support the patients of the Denmead Health Centre, including those from Hambledon and the surrounding area. 

It is appreciated that being in the countryside, public transport links to the area’s hospitals and treatment centres are extremely limited. 

The Health Centre Reception can provide you with a telephone number to contact one of our coordinators to assist with your transport needs. 

A volunteer driver can collect you from your home and take you to your appointment, assist you in getting you to the right department, wait for you, and to take you home on completion. 

All we ask for is a contribution towards costs. 

We also have a minibus which does various trips to village functions, shopping centres and day trip outings. 

While sadly it is not equipped to accommodate wheelchair users, if you can climb the steps into the minibus it will open up many opportunities to getting out and about in our area. 

See the Practice Noticeboard for details.

20 Jun, 2023
Havant and Waterlooville PCN

Please follow this link for regular updates within our Primary Care Network via their facebook page.

Havant and Waterlooville PCN | Facebook

Thank you

Please follow this link for regular updates within our Primary Care Network via their facebook page.

Havant and Waterlooville PCN | Facebook

Thank you

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